In case you haven’t already seen the Otherwild sweatshirts proudly worn by feminists all over Instagram, let us clue you in on a little something: The future is female. With that in mind, we looked to a rising crop of young women (and femmes!) who are changing the world—from a designer who wants fashion to be more inclusive of curvy bodies to an inventor harnessing solar power for clean drinking water. Female? Absolutely. Perhaps that’s why the future is looking brighter than ever.

Chloe and Halle

The Musical Prodigies

Rebecca Dharmapalan

The Filmmaker

Kyndall Harris

The Mover

Shannon Yan

The Girl Who Codes

Avery McCall

The Humanitarian

Marley Dias

The Literary Warrior

Sadie Hernandez

The Women's Rights Advocate

Olivia Hallisey

The Health Crisis Savior

Mo'ne Davis

The Athlete

Deepika Kurup

The Clean Water Genius

Mars and Sage

The Curators

Kai Morton

The App Inventor

Maya Varma

The Engineer

Jazz Jennings

The Advocate

Mikalia Ulmer

The Entrepreneur

Lucia Santina Ribisi

The Artist

Amanda Gorman

The Writer

Chloe Kim

The Gravity Defier

Egypt Ufele

The Designer

The Inventors

Shannon Yan

THE GIRL WHO CODES

Shannon Yan started coding when she was 16 — but by her standards, she was way behind. “Compared to a lot of my peers, that was late!” she insists. “I was a sophomore…a lot of kids start in elementary school.”

Kai Morton

THE APP INVENTOR

Kai Morton knows six languages and is learning two more. She's fluent in Java, JavaScript, and HTML/CSS; conversational in Python, Swift, and Ruby; and learning Unity and Objective-C. And that's before you get to the ones she speaks.

Maya Varma

THE ENGINEER

Right now, at colleges around the country, freshmen are moving into their dorms, figuring out where everything is on campus, and playing a lot of icebreakers to get to know their new classmates. And at Stanford this September, Maya Varma will have some pretty amazing fun facts about herself to share with the other members of the class of 2020.

Olivia Hallisey

THE HEALTH CRISIS SAVIOR

Many guidance counselors will tell you that junior year is the most important in high school, when it comes to getting into the college of your choice. And while for most of us that means loading up on some APs, trying to land a leadership position in the extracurricular activity of our choice, and doing some extra community service, for Olivia Hallisey that was the bare minimum.

Deepika Kurup

THE CLEAN WATER GENIUS

Deepika Kurup grew up going to India every summer with her family to visit her relatives there. But during one trip when she was a middle-schooler, she noticed people on the streets who were drinking water that appeared too dirty to even *touch*. That got her thinking: What could she do to help?

Mikalia Ulmer

THE ENTREPRENEUR

What happens when you get stung by two different bees in one week? Most people would probably cry and proclaim that they hate insects forever, but 11-year-old Mikaila Ulmer, from Austin, Texas, took her painful brush with bees and turned it into lemonade. Literally.

The Artists

Chloe & Halle

THE MUSICAL PRODIGIES

Chloe and Halle Bailey are having quite the 2016. Their EP, *Sugar Symphony*, debuted in April this year, and they were invited to the White House's Easter Egg Roll by First Lady Michelle Obama. They also performed their haunting single "Drop" at the BET Awards — you know, the show that featured an epic opening performance from their mentor, [Beyoncé](http://www.teenvogue.com/tag/beyonce).

Mars & Sage

THE CURATORS

There are new kids on the art scene and they’re not your typical hipsters. By now, you’ve probably heard of or seen Art Hoe Collective while scrolling through Tumblr or Instagram. Or maybe you’ve seen our cover stars showing support by adding the art hoe collective hashtag to their images, but Art Hoe is more than a just a searched tag. It’s a movement that was created to give artists of color a platform to showcase their work that could otherwise be overlooked.

Egypt Ufele

THE DESIGNER

“My mom always told me to turn a negative into a positive—that’s why I started ChubbiLine” says Egypt “Ify” Ufele, the pintsized designer who was inspired to create a clothing brand for people of all shapes and sizes after being teased for her weight. “I was verbally and physically bullied and knew that being creative was my comfort zone, so I used it to my advantage.”

Lucia Santina Ribisi

THE ARTIST

You may not be familiar with the name Lucia Santina Ribisi, but chances are you've seen her work. The wunderkind artist, just 18, caught the attention of Hedi Slimane with her "Pet Names Painting," a kaleidoscopic mix of color with the word "Baby" scrawled across the top.

Amanda Gorman

THE WRITER

By her fourth birthday, Amanda Gorman was already writing "ideas and stories." By third grade, she had a short series and mini-novel to her name. As a fourth-grader, Amanda felt "the urge to write more than the urge to eat, waking up in the early, pale dawn hours to work on some piece." It's no wonder that the 17-year-old scribe is well on her way to becoming a national treasure.

Marley Dias

THE LITERARY WARRIOR

We've all gotten fed up with the books teachers assign from time to time. But sometimes, not wanting to do the homework reading goes deeper than simply not enjoying Nathaniel Hawthorne's prose.

For 11-year-old Marley Dias, it was not seeing herself represented in the books she was reading in class. Frustrated with only being assigned tomes about, as she put it in a TV interview, "white boys and dogs,” Marley set out to find some books that were more representative of the world she lives in.

The Athletes

Kyndall Harris

THE MOVER

One of the youngest dance phenoms in the history of the Internet to gain instafame, Kyndall Harris is anything but your average teen. Unlike the countless toddlers tripping over their own feet whose clips rack up millions of views, Kyndall possesses real, raw talent and serious moves—and she never hesitates to bust them out on the spot if you do her the small favor of asking.

Mo'ne Davis

THE ATHLETE

“I was just kind of born to play,” says Mo’ne Davis of her propensity towards sports. One could say that’s an understatement given the young athlete’s shutout during the 2014 Little League World Series when she was only 13. Her remarkable play was the first ever for a girl, and Mo’ne completed the record-setting game for her team, the Philadelphia Taney Dragons.

Chloe Kim

THE GRAVITY DEFIER

With three X Game gold medals and 121,000 Instagram followers to her name, elite snowboarder Chloe Kim never loses her cool.

She’s been snowboarding competitively since she was six years old; she barely remembers her first competition, but admits she was “probably pretty nervous.” At age 14, she became the youngest female snowboarder ever to win a gold medal at the X Games. Now, at 16, the California native sees snowboarding as a mix of strategy and spontaneity.

The Social Warriors

Jazz Jennings

THE ADVOCATE

We have always watched kids live their lives and grow up on TV, but Jazz Jennings, 15, is the first transgender girl to share her life with the world, which she has been doing for almost 10 years.

Rebecca Dharmapalan

THE FILMMAKER

Oakland, California native Rebecca Dharmapalan had never heard the word “pimp” outside of MTV, until she found out one of her classmates was being “pimped out” by her older boyfriend. “I’d never heard it used on actual girls in America,” says Dharmapalan in her TedxTeen talk.

Avery McCall

THE HUMANITARIAN

When Avery McCall was 12, she read the book Half the Sky by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, and recognized how fortunate she was. Girls her age in other parts of the world weren't in school, were victims of sex-trafficking, and were forced to undergo unspeakable horrors such as female genital mutilation.

Sadie Hernandez

THE WOMEN’S RIGHTS ADVOCATE

When Sadie Hernandez started listening to punk music on her iPod as a kid, she had no idea that it would eventually lead her to a career in activism. While she didn’t necessarily identify with the lyrics that bands like Anti-Flag were singing, she could tell that their message of individual action and not blindly accepting what government imposes upon you was important.